Category Archives for "Commerical Drones"

Drone Video Services – Aerial Photography For Business

Drone Video Services - Aerial Photography For Business

Drone Video Services - Aerial Photography For BusinessDrone sales have soared in the past few years and their popularity with businesses is increasing all the time. UAV operators offering drone video services are widely available and in constant demand.

Companies are using this new technology to upgrade their marketing efforts, improve customer service and produce stunning imagery on a modest budget. No one knows how quickly companies could begin to see an ROI from these unmanned aircraft, but as with any new technology it pays to be ahead of the curve.

Drone Video Services – The Potential

Create innovative & exciting marketing content

As the quality of drone footage improves from one year to the next many marketing professionals are enlisting UAV operators offering drone video services and ask them to create breathtaking visual content. Armed with this media they can offer consumers stunning shots taken from fresh perspectives, even if they’re working with a modest budget.

Affordability is and will continue to be a unique selling point; even small to medium sized businesses will be able to produce professional grade audiovisuals with a minimum of experience. This immediacy will also prevent the kind of delays which are associated with adopting a new technology; many of the applications employed by drones are designed to be user friendly and accessible to all.

However, if a company would prefer not to operate a drone in-house, there is an ever increasing database of stock photos and videos available online.

Drones in the workplace

Drone footage lends itself well to innovation and creatively, the kind of marketing teams that enjoy experimenting with their output will appreciate the super-fast time to market speeds drone video services can provide. However, aerial video production is also making inroads into many traditional professions.

For architecture teams, drone video services represent a more economical solution than manned aircraft when aerial photographs or video are needed. Drones can relay data that enables drafts people and builders to map an area to the finest detail, producing highly accurate representations of the space below.

Drones on site

Drones can also be useful when it comes to selling new homes, as people are far more inspired by smooth HD video showing a 360 degree view, than they would be by flat floor plans and photos.

Similarly, estate agents can enlist drones to deliver an in-depth view of not only a house or apartment, but the surrounding properties, local shops and the neighbourhood. This gives potential buyers a greater sense of what the area is like and whether it could be right for them.

In turn this enables estate agents to market available properties more effectively, finding buyers who are more likely follow through with a sale, before they even arrange a viewing.

Drones to promote exotic locations

The travel and tourism industry is also set to be revolutionised by drone technology. Short aerial videos provide a company’s target market with excellent quality videography revealing a unique view of each resort and its location. The footage can promote not just individual hotels, but the attractions which surround the resort, the tours guests could take and the various destinations nearby.

Luxury hotels set in remote locations often look even more exquisite when filmed from an aerial perspective; the property can use drone footage to highlight its surroundings, manicured gardens and idyllic beach from every angle, using visual imagery which would never be as striking in a static, terrestrial shot. Guests gain the kind of overview that they can look forward to seeing when they arrive, getting a feel for the entire property and increasing their desire to visit.

Monetising a YouTube channel

YouTubers who bring something fresh and new to viewers can quickly begin to make money through advertising revenue, and merchandise. Drone footage that is well-shot and delivers interesting images can attract huge numbers of subscribers, from daredevil stunts, to visions of the natural world and buildings that cannot be reached on foot.

Once subscriber numbers are up, users can promote their products, advertise their website or sign up to be a YouTube advertising partner.

Stunning cinematography with drone footage

There’s no doubt that a drone video service can raise the standard of cinematography and visual communication for filmmakers working independently, even those on a strict budget. Many viewers have become accustomed to establishing shots filmed using a drone, but whilst miles of unspoilt wilderness or vibrant city streets do look great, the technology is capable of more.

Filmmakers can use drone shots for tracking a scene, establishing a reveal and a variety of artistic shots. Just think back to the opening scene of the James Bond outing, Skyfall, where Agent 007 was captured by drones as he tracked down a terrorist.

In any level of cinematic production, budgetary concerns always loom large. Using a drone can alleviate some of that stress by reducing the need for specialist knowledge and equipment like tracks, cranes and jibs. A drone is much smaller than this cumbersome set up and can capture shots in any space fast, saving both time and money.

Wedding videography using a drone service

Drone photography has become a major trend in the wedding industry, with many would-be couples choosing to capture their big day in an original way. Drones are associated with sweeping panoramic shots, but they can be there right from the start, recording the church ceremony, the guest’s reactions and the surroundings, all without ever disturbing the event.

If spotted at the reception, drones can make a fun distraction, as many people are unfamiliar with them and feel entertained by watching them dart around. Many couples choose to have a drone service at their wedding because it can give the event a star quality.

It’s a sophisticated, high-end alternative to having a wedding photographer; there is no need for flash photography and no unnatural breaks in the ceremony for a quick snap – so the day feels more natural.

Couples can also use drone photography to showcase elements of the venue which are especially beautiful or significant to them, in a dynamic way. From historic buildings, to churches and contemporary hotels, these flying cameras can produce images that will remain fascinating for years to come.

Being airborne a drone can easily take shots and video which would otherwise be impossible to achieve, children playing on the lawn whilst the bride and her mother hug nearby, the groom nervously pacing and the family beaming with pride. All of these intimate moments can be edited together to produce an emotional record of the day.

Drones in industry

It’s not just the creative world which has found a use for aerial video production; in the UK many industrial companies are also considering the benefits of a drone video service. There are endless applications for drones in terms of providing data and collecting images for commercial concerns.

Utility companies need to maintain oil, gas and electricity lines, and civil engineers can use the information for mapping and surveying an area. There is also huge potential for drone use in the insurance industry, especially when a flood or other devastating natural event has affected people’s homes. Drones could be sent in to places that assessors cannot yet reach, to photograph the aftermath and enable claims to be processed faster.

The future of drone video services

Drone technology has only been available since 2012 and industry insiders believe that it will be the end users, rather than the manufacturers that decide what changes the future will bring. New innovations will emerge depending on the ways in which drones are incorporated into the commercial and private world.

Right now many drones are future proof; they can be adapted by software developers using apps to change how they work and produce a more bespoke result. The hope is that drones will become integrated into our lives in the same way as smart phones have, partly used as an entertainment device, but also capable of much more.

We know the technology works, so now one of the biggest challenges is acceptance; once people have seen the benefits they can better understand the possibilities.

April 4, 2016

New System to Warn Airports

A new system to warn airports about drones operating nearby has been announced in Aerotime . Called the Digital Notice & Awareness System or D-NAS it allows a drone operator to forewarn airports of planned operations in their vicinity ahead of time. D-NAS then transmits live GPS position information to the airport during the drone flight. The apps that we already use to monitor our drones in flight are utilised to forward data to the controllers over the internet. Simple but effective tools like these will help bring drone operations into the mainstream and reduce the bad press we sometimes get!

Bad Example from the BBC?

Was the drone footage of migrants camped on the Greece/Macedonia border a bad example from the BBC?

Right now there is a daily debate about the public use of drones; where and when they can fly, who can fly them, what is safe. Of course the UK CAA has published some easy to follow guidance in their Drone Code and if everyone stuck to it there would be less of an issue. But non-professional hobby drone fliers may not even be aware of the guidance or if they are they may not properly understand it all, so they might take their lead from what they see on TV. Which brings me to the BBC.

On Tuesday March 8th the BBC’s reporter was in the ever growing migrant/refugee encampment on the Greek side of the border with Macedonia. As he talked the video cut to some drone footage showing the appalling conditions and the sheer size of the camp – so far, so good (or so bad in fact…). Then the drone was clearly flown right over the camp and the thousands of people in it. Under the CAA rules this would not be permitted – surely this was an organised gathering of more than 1,000 people?

The CAA has no jurisdiction in Greece but this seems to set a very public example of breaching the UK rules.